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Redirecting the Hustle

Redirecting the Hustle

Moderator Nathan Smith, diversity, equity and inclusion specialist, and panelists Jonathan Cabrera, behavioral sciences criminal justice lecturer and KCC's NYC Men Teach program manager; Ty Hankerson, district chief of staff for NYC Council Speaker Adrienne E. Adams; and Arturo Enamorado III, behavioral sciences lecturer, KCC's NYC Men Teach assistant program coordinator and LGBTQ+ student organization co-faculty advisor

Redirecting the Hustle

Last Monday’s event, “Redirecting the Hustle,” left students wanting more. The event was created to show students ways to redirect the hustle life into a successful and profitable career. Students were incredibly engaged and inquisitive, with students sharing their interpretations of the term “hustling,” which they typically did to advance their future and sometimes feed their families. Hustling was mostly interpreted as something positive, highlighting the need to be driven, industrious, have a strong work ethic, determined, and focused. 

Moderator Nathan Smith, diversity, equity and inclusion specialist, and panelists Jonathan Cabrera, behavioral sciences criminal justice lecturer and KCC's NYC Men Teach program manager; Ty Hankerson, district chief of staff for NYC Council Speaker Adrienne E. Adams; and Arturo Enamorado III, behavioral sciences lecturer, KCC's NYC Men Teach assistant program coordinator and LGBTQ+ student organization co-faculty advisor provided incredible insight into what it means to hustle, their experiences with hustling, and how their lives have been transformed by directing their energies toward more effective ways of social and economic stability. 

“Before the start of the event I had the chance to talk to a student and a couple of interns about their interests and stories. Immediately I received positive energy from them as they were anticipating the discussion,” said Nathan Smith. “As the event got underway, I was thoroughly impressed with the engagement of the audience. Several students demonstrated insight and vulnerability during the discussion. Other students contributed in ways that enriched the discussion and sparked further conversation points from the panel,” added Nathan.

Students offered their varied views of what it means to hustle and how it has provided them with ways to advance their future and sometimes, feed their families.

“Each student delivered their stories about hustle culture with conviction and admonition,” said Nathan. “Not only did they convey pitfalls to be aware of but they also gave tangible advice of how to navigate those challenges. At the conclusion of the event, students came up to engage with the panel and staff which was a testament to the event's success.” 

The world is transforming at a rapid pace. Students are constantly challenged to find methods of survival in this competitive landscape. College is a primary medium toward that survival, and students have decided that this journey to gain a better education, is the biggest and most important hustle they could pursue. 

“Our moderator, Nathan Smith, did a great job eliciting vibrant and rich conversations not only from the panelist but the attendees as well,” said Dr. Michael Rodriguez, director of the Men’s Resource Center and CUNY Black Male Initiative Project at Kingsborough. “Learning that there are multiple ways to ‘hustle’ is an important skill for everyone to learn but especially when beginning college. I look forward to more conversations like this one.”

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